Naked bone of an echo

I drink 1000 shipwrecks, tonight I'll steal your paychecks...




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Last weekend when the weather broke for a little while (it has been rainy for weeks now it seems), S and I decided to take the bus down to the South Street Seaport Museum since we had both never been there. The seaport was crowded since it was Labor Day weekend and most people seemed to be standing in line for the Bodies exhibit so the museum and ships were fairly empty which was pretty sweet.

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After a much needed meal at Acme (I cannot get enough of their cornbread), we headed to IFC to see This Film is Not Yet Rated which I highly recommend. A documentary about the ratings system in the US, it was pretty shocking. I don't want to give too much away but it was well done and very eye opening. IFC is also very re-vamped and sexy now which I don't think we were expecting. Hooray for fabulous independent theaters with swank (and free short films before every film to boot)!

Back to work. Is this week over yet?


Current Mood: Gingerbread coffee in the veins
Current Music: Zentriert ins Antlitz - Prozium
Naked bone of an echo

Satisfaction is Automat-ic




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The day that S and I went to the Met and ended up seeing the exhibit that I posted about earlier this week here, we had a goal of seeing anything but paintings there since we both have been to the Met more times than we can remember and wanted to spend time appreciating art of the non-painting variety.

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Naked bone of an echo

What the sound of a jaw dropping looks like.



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Photo: Irving Solero and Jennifer Park


S and I stuck around our neighborhood during the day on Saturday again, this time going to the Metropolitan Museum of Art which is a 15 minute hop, skip and jump from our tiny apartment. While I have tons of photos that I took there that I still need to go through, I had to post about the costume exhibit there currently which is ending soon (September 4th) which blew me away. When I say it was one of the best costume exhibits I have ever seen and experienced I am not exaggerating even a little bit.

I had no expectations for it since I hadn't been to the Met in a while and oddly enough, had no clue that this exhibit even was running (I am ashamed of this fact actually). The exhibit's name is AngloMania: Tradition and Transgression in British Fashion and instead of housing it in the dreary basement of the Met where most of the Costume Institute's exhibits are (which I personally get very turned off by since everything is behind glass and no matter how atmospheric they try to make things, it just feels like being at a clothing zoo (an old time zoo) minus the alive factor if that makes sense) they put it in the open in the English Period Rooms section of the Met on the 1st Floor which created a very eerie and amazing effect.

Not only did putting it in the period rooms make it extraordinary but the lighting was AMAZING. The rooms were dimly lit creating a very impressive, dramatic effect. You travel through the rooms as if you are an eyewitness to these amazing scenes and the experience is viscerally chill inducing.

Since photography was prohibited there, I dug up the best photos I could find that would give a glimpse into the nature of the exhibit along with explanations from the curator, Andrew Bolton.

** A note, the following professional photos are excellent and do their best to show the dramatic exhibit but it should be stated that the rooms were very dark in person so if you can imagine the lighting in such a way, that would do it more justice.

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Naked bone of an echo

It pays to explore your own neighborhood sometimes.

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The S and I decided to stick close to our apartment on Saturday and decided to go check out a museum we had both never been to and a part of Central Park near us that we had never been to either , The Conservatory Garden. Both were only 10 minutes from our apartment and I think we were both in disbelief that we had never checked either out after seeing them, especially that part of the park which was serene and very beautiful.

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Naked bone of an echo

The fastest way from Point A to Point B...purrr



I have been completely enthralled with something I had no clue even existed before S and I went on a whim to go see Luc Besson's Banlieue 13 last weekend. Banlieue 13 is a film set in the (extreme) ghettos of Paris in 2010 about an undercover cop and ex-thug trying to infiltrate a gang in order to defuse a neutron bomb.

The film showcases David Belle (who I have such an intense crush on now mmmm), the 'founder' of a relatively new 'sport' (in quotes because I view it as more of a philosophy put into practical physical application...meow!) called Parkour which one passes through obstacles in the fastest and most direct manner possible (sweet effiency how I love you), using skills such as jumping, vaulting and climbing, or the more specific parkour moves. The obstacles can be anything in one's environment, so Parkour is often practiced in urban areas because of many suitable public structures, such as buildings, rails, and walls.

Here is an awesome clip of this in practice from Banlieue 13:



(seriously amazing clip, watch to the end to understand how our jaws were on the ground for the whole film hah. And yes, that is David Belle, and there are no stunt men, that is him taking the falls and doing all that sexy wall climbing.)

Here is a rather long documentary (over an hour) about the Yamakasi, the group of founders of Free Movement which resembles Parkour. The philosophy of the Yamakasis, however, is that of aesthetics and complete freedom of movement from point A to point B, as opposed to Parkour which focuses on efficiency of movement between point A to point B, without the emphasis on aesthetics. Hence Yamakasis perform flips and tricks, while traceurs (Parkour practioners) do not. Luc Besson actually made a whole movie about the Yamakasi called Yamakasi - Les samouraïs des temps modernes which supposedly was light on plot but heavy on showcasing the Yamakasi doing what they do best. Who cares about plot really though? I could watch these types of videos all day! ;)

The flips and tricks are hypnotizing to watch :D :

http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=-3773384792923323349&q=generation+yamakasi
Fingers curl around lips

Mmmm...yes!



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Features:
- Sails made of high-grade steel circumscribe the bed

Description:
In front of an exclusively blue background mirrored sails have been set up around the bed. This room was previously called Mirrors, it was and still remains one of the earliest City Lodge favourites.



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Features:
- The room is topsy-turvy
- Four beds and four seats are beneath
- No Smoking Room

Description:
The furnishings hang from the ceiling and you sleep and sit in comfortable boxes beneath the floorboards. Uncannily surreal! The only four-bed room. One of the most unique accomodations.


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Naked bone of an echo

Jane Austen's characters did not move about in soft lighting all the time...




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I cannot stop looking at these.


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So much going on.

All I have to say is that if you watch the (most amazingly done, sweepingly brilliant) 1996 Version of Pride and Predjudice with Colin Firth and Jennifer Ehle (BBC - 5 hours long!) and then decide that watching the crappy, ultra Hollywood version of Jane Austen's Emma with (why do they let her act?!) Gwyneth Paltrow is a good idea you will be most likely extremely disappointed and sorely upset. BBC has (had) the right idea. That is all.
Naked bone of an echo

(no subject)



Do many of you really live 'in the moment'?

I came to a realization recently that I think I spent the better part of my early twenties passing through my life but living largely right after everything would happen. Everything happened to me, but the me of then was living very out of body. It was like I was viewing my life as if it was totally detached from me. Even passion and orgasms were sweeter when dwelled upon hours after the fact. I would even relish the nostalgia *more* than the actual moments as they happened, the good and the terrible.

Does this make sense?

I feel like only in the last two years or so that I actually started to feel present in the moment. Now when I have an orgasm, am lost in a kiss or am in an embrace or talk with someone and look into their eyes, it feels so much more intense as if I finally jumped into myself after all that time. I do still dwell at points but not as intensely and I relish being in the moments more.

Maybe this is why when I look back on all the craziness of my early twenties it all seems like a really distant dream. I look at my hands and my legs and my eyes and I wonder if that was really me, if those parts of my body were *even* there at all in the memories I have.
Naked bone of an echo

My pre-historic landscape is your post-apocalyptic dream




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I have been using Kim Keever's work (above) as desktops for quite a while and I just looked through them while drinking my morning green tea here and got lost in them once again.

He apparently photographs through a tank in which he creates the landscape, fills the tank with water and then squirts in paint to create the atmospheric clouds and random ambiance.




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Thank you *everyone* who gave the most awesome recommendations in my last entry regarding book recommendations.


Work beckons..

Current Mood: Lemon Verbena and Spearmint
Current Music: Cafe De Paris: 1930-1941: 24 Accordion Classics - Charmeur De Serpents